Office of Business Affairs

                                             

State of Michigan Higher Education Bill - Section 245

From the funds appropriated in section 236, each public university shall develop, post,
and maintain, on a user-friendly and publicly accessible Internet site, a comprehensive
report categorizing all institutional general fund expenditures made by the university
within a fiscal year.

The report shall include institutional general fund expenditure amounts categorized both
by each academic unit, administrative unit, or external initiative within the university and
by major expenditure category, including faculty and staff salaries and fringe benefits,
facility-related costs, supplies and equipment, contracts, and transfers to and from other university funds.

The report shall also include a list of all employee positions funded partially or wholly through institutional general fund revenue that includes the position title, name, and annual salary
or wage amount for each position.

The university shall not provide financial information on its website under this section if doing so would violate a federal or state law, rule, regulation, or guideline that establishes privacy or security standards applicable to that financial information.


Joint Capital Outlay Subcommittee (JCOS)

                                

Use and Finance Bi-Annual Reports

2012 - 2013


PART 1

1A. Annual Operating Budget

Revenue

  State Appropriations
  Tuition and Fees
  Indirect Cost Recovery
  Investment Income - Other
  Departmental Activities

  Total Revenue
  Total Expenditures

2013-2014

22,503, 700
96,059,000
1,350,000
87,000
430,900

120,430,600
120,430,600

FY 2013-2014 General Fund Budget




1D. Positions Funded Through General Fund


PART 2

Fall 2009
AY/FY 2010

Fall 2010
AY/FY 2011

Fall 2011
AY/FY 20
12

Fall 2012
AY/FY 2013

2A. Enrollment

Undergraduate
Graduate
Total

6,778
1,601
8,379

7,006
1593
8,599

7,188
1,476
8,664

7,550
1,533
9,083

2B. First Year Retention Rate (FTIAC Cohort)

83%

82%

82%

N/A

2C. Six Year Graduation Rate

Each year is equivalent to
6 years prior

 53%

52%

49%

52%

2D. Number of Pell Grant Recipients

 

Fall Term UG Pell Recipients

2,500
37%

2,936
42%

3,040
47%

3,018
41.7%

 

 

 

 

 

Annual UG Pell Recipients

2,789
34%

3,331
40%

3,376
41%

3,246
385

 

 

 

 

 

Graduated Recipients

 

1,100

1,180

1,223


 

 

 

 

Current Recipients

 

578
52.5%

622
52.7%

669
54.7%

2E. Geographic Origin of Students

In-State
Out-of-State
International
Total

7,865
261
253
8,379

7,991
331
277
8,599

7,993
331
320
8,664

8,020
331
439
8,790

 

 

 

 

 

2F. Employee to Student Ratios

Faculty to Student Ratio
Employee to Student Ratio
Total Employees & Faculty

17-1
12-1
1,015

16-1
13-1
1,037

16-1
13-1
1,030

14-1
12-1
1,064 

2G. Teaching Load

All regular tenure track and tenured faculty with full time appointments are expected to spend 75% of their time in instruction, 15% in research activities and 10% in administrative activities.  Their teaching load translates to 8-9 credits per semester.

Lecturers Employee Organization (LEO)


2H. Graduation Outcome Rates

Graduation outcome rates, including employment and continuing education.

(i)  Many of the Michigan public universities do not routinely and systematically survey all their graduation seniors to gather data for a reliable response to this metric.  At present there is no common core set of questions and no consistent date for survey administration.  Depending on the institution and the timing, response rates may be low and also biased towards students who have been successful in either entering the workforce or a graduate program. While institutions are making an effort to report the data that is available to them, care should be taken interpreting the results.

(ii)  The current way of measuring graduation rates does not take into account students that do not start at a university in a traditional sense, meaning a graduating high school senior who begins college after high school and remains at an institution for his/her entire academic career. For many universities, such as UM-Dearborn, transfer students are very important to university enrollment and mission. More than half of our undergraduate students come to us as transfer students from local community colleges and other four-year colleges and universities. This is typical of institutions in our Carnegie Classification. When evaluating our university’s ability to provide value to the undergraduate experience we support Michigan School Data, which includes National Student Clearinghouse Data, to track undergraduate academic success across all post-secondary institutions. This measurement is a more accurate way to track academic success. All Michigan public post-secondary institutions contribute to the Michigan School Data P-20 Data System, and a large number of Michigan private institutions and national public and private institutions participate in National Clearinghouse Data. This method demonstrates that after six years, more than 80 percent of students who began at UM-Dearborn graduate from our university, a different college or university, or are still enrolled in school. Universities should be recognized if they contribute to the academic success of a student.

(iii) UM-Dearborn obtains post-graduation data from our students for a time period of up to six months after graduation. We survey students two, four and six months after their graduation date, which provides students with several opportunities to report post-graduation status changes.  Data is collected from April, August and December graduates. UM-Dearborn has been collecting this data since 2008.  In 2010, the latest tabulated report posted online, 87 percent of students achieved their post-graduation goals. Goals included employment, graduate school, entering public service or delaying a career.  A link to the report can be found at: www.umd.umich.edu/695960/.

Many of the Michigan public universities do not routinely and systematically survey all their graduating seniors to gather data for a reliable response to this metric.  At present there is no common core set of questions and no consistent date for survey administration.  Depending on the institution and the timing, response rates may be low and also biased towards students who have been successful in either entering the workforce or a graduate program.  While institutions are making an effort to report the data that is available to them, care should be taken in interpreting the results.