Department of Public Safety

Heat Index Table

HEAT STRESS: THE DEGREES OF DANGER

Recognizing the early signs of heat-related illness and acting quickly can prevent a mild reaction from becoming a fatal response.

TYPE OF HEAT STRESS

SYMPTOMS

TREATMENT

Heat Fatigue

Impaired motor skills.

Move person to the shade or cool area.

Heat Cramps

Painful muscle spasms, sweaty skin.

 

  1. Move person to a reclining position in the shade or cool area.
  2. Give the person fluid replacement. (Electrolyte imbalance: too little or too much salt).
  3. Stretching muscles may help. Do not massage.

Heat Exhaustion

Headache, nausea, clammy or pale skin, rapid pulse, weakness, thirst and giddiness.

 

  1. Move person to a reclining position in the shade or cool area.
  2. Call Public Safety for emergency help.
  3. Give the person fluid replacement.
  4. Encourage the person to get adequate rest.

Heat Stroke

Unconsciousness (or, if conscious, confused, staggered walk, agitated), hot dry skin or (rarely) sweating, rapid pulse, body temperature of 105 degrees Fahrenheit or higher.

 

  1. Move person to a reclining position in the shade or cool area.
  2. Call Public Safety for emergency help.
  3. If a person is conscious, offer sips of cool water.
  4. Fan the person and apply cool towels.
  5. Seek medical attention.

 

HEAT INDEX TABLE

Workers can lose up to two gallons of fluid a day, causing fatigue and other heat-related illnesses that result in reduced productivity and lost time. Most workers will drink less than required because thirst is not an adequate indicator of how much essential fluids and electrolytes have been lost. Use electrolyte-replacement beverages when heat and heavy exertion can put workers in danger of dehydration.

Air Temperature*

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

Relative Humidity

Apparent Temperature*

0%

64

69

73

78

83

87

91

95

99

103

107

10%

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

111

116

20%

66

72

77

82

87

93

99

105

112

120

130

30%

67

73

78

84

90

96

104

113

123

135

148

40%

68

74

79

86

93

101

110

123

137

151

50%

69

75

81

88

96

107

120

135

150

60%

70

76

82

90

100

114

132

149

 

70%

70

77

85

93

106

124

144

 

 

80%

71

78

86

97

113

136

157

 

 

90%

71

79

88

102

122

150

170

 

 

100%

72

80

91

108

133

166

 

 

 

 

The index is a measure of the contribution that high humidity makes with abnormally high temperatures in reducing the body’s ability to cool itself. For example, the index shows that for an actual air temperature of 100 degrees Fahrenheit and a relative humidity of 50 percent, the effect on the human body would be the same as 120 degrees. Sunstroke and heat exhaustion are likely when the heat index reaches 150. This index is a measure of what hot weather "feels like" to the average person for various temperatures and relative humidities.

* degrees Fahrenheit